What Does The Bible Say


The names of God

According to the English Bible, the name of the Savior-Son of Elohim, the Most High One, is JESUS. But then, “JESUS” is English and definitely seems odd as a name for the Savior who was born Jewish! The name “JESUS”, being English, could never have been found in the Holy Scriptures that Elohim inspired and caused to be written in Hebrew, from which the English Bible was later made. Simply put, because the name “JESUS” is not Hebrew, it is not part of the inspired Word of Elohim which He led holy men to write!

Amazingly, the name “JESUS” never even came to salvation seekers as a result of the translation of any Hebrew name found in the Hebrew Holy Scriptures, as many commonly presume, since names and titles of people are never deemed translatable. Instead, it was deliberately introduced into the Holy Scriptures by some being of evil intent!!


Students of the English Bible know that “JESUS” is a name of Greek origin—coming from IZEUS or IOSEUS. Now, IZEUS means something like “The Son of Zeus” while ZEUS is a feared Greek deity! What this means is that, the name JESUS has in it the inextricable substance and value (DNA?) of the Greek deity, ZEUS!!
And yet, bible readers have come to accept the name JESUS, which came not from Elohim, but from translators of the Hebrew Holy Scriptures, as belonging to the Jewish-born Savior of the world, who, in all his days in Yisroel, was called by a Jewish name by an entire Jewish nation!


Had bible translators not done the work of translating the Hebrew Holy Scriptures that they did, which they even did without the mandate of Elohim, salvation seekers today would never have known the name JESUS given to them in the English Bible as being the only name attributable to the Savior, and thus, would not have been deceived to seek the salvation of Elohim in and by it as they have done!


On two occasions, Elohim sent a Malach (angel) to give the Hebrew name for His Son—a name that was already known and revered by all Malachim (angels) in Heaven—to his would-be “parents” on Earth so mankind would never make a mistake in this, in naming him differently when he was born or in ever referring to him by some other name throughout mankind’s history on Earth. This Hebrew name is “YESHUA”, which means “Salvation”.


In as much as all names are of eternal value, being spirit in nature, YESHUA is, no doubt, the name that the Savior is forever known by in Heaven, and must thus be accepted by all on Earth forever and ever. In so far as names are spirit, any change of name must necessitate a change of spirit [being]! Do salvation seekers, therefore, see what danger there is in turning from YESHUA to Jesus??


The question to ask is: Do “Yeshua” and “Jesus” get the same response or have the same effect or recognition in Heaven, when uttered on Earth? Is the spirit known as Yeshua the same as the one known as JESUS? Can any two spirits be the same? Anyway, why was the need for the change in name from YESHUA to JESUS if the two names mean the same or belong to one being? Think about this!


Of more curiosity to me is, if the name “YESHUA” is what Heaven recognizes and has ordained for men to profess faith in, so as to receive the salvation of Elohim (Acts 4:10-12), would the name JESUS do same? Dear reader, think deeply about these questions.


Have English Bible translators and publishers, in JESUS, given the world a translation for the name YESHUA? Well, not only is it ridiculous for translators to do this, it is also unacceptable because all names and titles, despite the cultures they emanate from, must remain the same everywhere on Earth. They must never be translated. They should only be transliterated. So then, why would English translators treat differently the name YESHUA?


The Hebrew title—HaMashiach—meaning “The Anointed One” is conferred on YESHUA by the Good Abba for mankind’s recognition, eternally. Sadly, this Hebrew title has become corrupted to “Messiah” in English in disregard of the fact that everyone is annoyed when his or her name or title is miss spelt, written wrongly, twisted, or pronounced crudely!

More Amazing Names of God

Back in the Bible days a person’s name usually said something about that person’s character or destiny. This is why the many names of God are vitally important for us to see and understand. Each name of God reveals something about His character. At the same time, God’s names show us many different ways in which He is there to help us in our times of need.

  • Elohim (God)
  • Yahweh (Lord, Jehovah)
  • El Elyon (The Most High God)
  • Adonai (Lord, Master)
  • El Shaddai (Lord God Almighty)
  • El Olam (The Everlasting God)
  • Jehovah Jireh (The LORD Will Provide)
  • Jehovah Rapha (The LORD Who Heals You)
  • Jehovah Nissi (The LORD Is My Banner)
  • El Qanna (Jealous God)
  • Jehovah Mekoddishkem (The LORD Who Sanctifies You)
  • Jehovah Shalom (The LORD Is Peace)
  • Jehovah Sabaoth (The LORD of Hosts)
  • Jehovah Raah (The LORD Is My Shepherd)
  • Jehovah Tsidkenu (The LORD Our Righteousness)
  • Jehovah Shammah (The LORD Is There)

We can see God’s names revealed to us throughout the pages of scripture. Often the Bible reveals a new name of God when the people either face a great need, or when see God come through and bless them in a spectacular way.
As time passed, the people of God received more and more revelation about the nature of God. This process continues today as His people discover more of His character. Each of us individually has the ability to learn ever more about God and his nature as we walk through life.
This is why it is so important to have a personal relationship with God the Father directly. Without that direct personal connection we only learn about God without ever growing to actually know Him.
By spending time in prayer and meditation on each name of God we can come to know Him in a far more personal and intimate way.

Names of God

Below are the various names of God listed in the order of their first appearance in the Bible. Included is a link to the scripture verse where the first mention of that name of God occurs along with how many times that name is mentioned throughout the Bible.

Elohim (God)

First seen in Genesis 1:1 – Used 2599 times in the Bible
This is the very first name given to God found in the very first verse of Genesis. This name shows that God is the majestic ruler over all. Elohim is actually a plural word and it’s use as the first name of God and sets him high above all other gods. It also foreshadows the later revelation of the triune Godhead – Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

Yahweh (Lord, Jehovah)

First seen in Genesis 2:4 – Used 6519 times in the Bible
Yahweh is the promised proper name of God. It means Lord and Master. By Jewish tradition this name is too holy to pronounce or write. Therefore they just wrote four letters without any vowels: YHWH. Jews stopped saying the name all together in the third century AD. They stopped saying this name because they were afraid of violating the fourth commandment that prohibits misusing, or taking the Lord’s name in vain. Therefore scholars today don’t know for sure if the original pronunciation was Yahweh or Jehovah.


Tradition follows the convention used in the King James Version which translates YHWH by itself as LORD with a capital L and small capital letters for the rest of the word. This is done to set it apart from other uses of the word lord. Then whenever YHWH occurs as a compound name with other words the translators use the word Jehovah instead.

El Elyon (The Most High God)

First seen in Genesis 14:18 – Used 52 times in the Bible (sometimes without El, simply as Elyon)
El is likely related to the word Elohim and is used in conjunction with other descriptive words to specifically reference a particular characteristic of God. Elyon means highest or most high. Used together El Elyon means The Most High God. It refers to the characteristic of God that is above everyone and everything. This name describes his position as sovereign majestic preeminent God.

Adonai (Lord, Master)

First seen in Genesis 15:2 – Used 434 times in the Bible
Because the Jews have a tradition of not pronouncing nor spelling out the promised proper name of God they often would use Adonai instead of YHWH. Adonai means Lord, Master, or Owner. This name emphasizes that God is in charge of his creation and his people, Lord of lords.

El Shaddai (Lord God Almighty)

First seen in Genesis 17:1 – Used 48 times in the Bible (sometimes without El, simply as Shaddai)


O Lord, our Lord,
How excellent is Your name in all the earth!

El is likely related to the word Elohim and is used in conjunction with other descriptive words to specifically reference a particular characteristic of God. Shaddai derives from the word for a woman’s breast (shad) and literally means “many breasted one.” This denotes God as provider, supplying, nourishing, and satisfying his people with their needs as a mother would her child. God our sustainer.


Shaddai is also related to the Hebrew word shadad which means to overpower or destroy, referring to God’s absolute power. This describes God as the one who triumphs over every obstacle and all opposition.
Used together El Shaddai is usually translated Lord God Almighty. God is our all-powerful and all-sufficient sustainer.

El Olam (The Everlasting God)

First seen in Genesis 21:33 – Used 439 times in the Bible
El is likely related to the word Elohim and is used in conjunction with other descriptive words to specifically reference a particular characteristic of God. Olam means forever, always, continuous existence, perpetual, everlasting, evermore, perpetual, indefinite or unending future, eternity. Used together El Olam means The Everlasting God. He exists beyond time and space. We can take comfort in the fact that God always was, and always will be God. Nothing we can ever face will change that because God is unchangeable.

Jehovah Jireh (The LORD Will Provide)

Only occurs once in Genesis 22:14
Jehovah is actually YHWH (see Yahweh above) and means Lord and Master. It is the promised and proper name of God. Jireh means to see or provide. When Isaac asked Abraham where the lamb was for the sacrifice, Abraham replied that the Lord would provide. After God provided the ram for the sacrifice Abraham named that place on Mount Moriah Jehovah Jireh, meaning The LORD Will Provide. God is quietly arranging things behind the scenes so that they will be in just the right place exactly when we need them.

Jehovah Rapha (The LORD Who Heals You)

Occurs only once in Exodus 15:26
Jehovah is actually YHWH (see Yahweh above) and means Lord and Master. It is the promised and proper name of God. Rapha means to heal or make healthful. Together Jehovah Rapha means The LORD Who Heals You. God is the Great Physician who heals his people. This truth in God’s name applies equally to emotional, psychological, and physical healing as well as to nations and individuals alike.

Jehovah Nissi (The LORD Is My Banner)

Occurs only once in Exodus 17:15

Some trust in chariots and some in horses,
but we trust in the name of the Lord our God.

Jehovah is actually YHWH (see Yahweh above) and means Lord and Master. It is the promised and proper name of God. Nissi means flag or banner so together Jehovah Nissi means The LORD Is My Banner. God himself is our banner and victory. He gives us hope and a focus, and is the one who wins our battles.

El Qanna (Jealous God)

First seen in Exodus 20:5 – Used 6 times in the Bible
El is likely related to the word Elohim and is used in conjunction with other descriptive words to specifically reference a particular characteristic of God. Qanna means jealous, zealous, or envy. Used together El Qanna means Jealous God. God’s jealousy is a holy, loving jealousy without any of the insecure manipulation or control that comes packaged with worldly jealousy. It draws from the marriage relationship with a picture of a husband jealous for his wife. God longs for each of us to put him first in our lives in priority and importance, not out out of ego, but because he knows that is truly what is best for us.

Jehovah Mekoddishkem (The LORD Who Sanctifies You)

First seen in Exodus 31:13 (Only other occurrence is in Leviticus 20:8)
Jehovah is actually YHWH (see Yahweh above) and means Lord and Master. It is the promised and proper name of God. Mekoddishkem means holy or set apart. It is the process of sanctification, which is the separation of something so that it is holy. Used together Jehovah Mekoddishkem (can have the variant spelling Jehovah M’Kaddesh) means The LORD Who Sanctifies You. God sets us apart as his children when we become believers. He sanctifies us and makes us holy because we are incapable of it on our own.

Jehovah Shalom (The LORD Is Peace)

Occurs only once in Judges 6:24

Jehovah is actually YHWH (see Yahweh above) and means Lord and Master. It is the promised and proper name of God. Shalom means peace, absence of strife, complete, or sound. Used together Jehovah Shalom means The LORD Is Peace. When it seems like the whole world is against you or that you you are completely unable to deal with whatever problem is in front of you, turn to the God of peace to find comfort and strength.

Jehovah Sabaoth (The LORD of Hosts)

First seen in 1 Samuel 1:3 – Used in the Bible more than 285 times
Jehovah is actually YHWH (see Yahweh above) and means Lord and Master. It is the promised and proper name of God. Sabaoth means an army going out to war. Used together Jehovah Sabaoth means The LORD of Armies or The LORD of Hosts. The Lord reigns over a vast well ordered host in the heavenlies. God is always there to defend us, fight our battles, and win our wars. There is no enemy he cannot defeat.

Jehovah Raah (The LORD Is My Shepherd)

Occurs once in Psalms 23:1. (Raah is also used in reference to God in Genesis 48:15, Genesis 49:24, and Psalm 80:1)
Jehovah is actually YHWH (see Yahweh above) and means Lord and Master. It is the promised and proper name of God. Raah means to shepherd or feed, to supply with food, and to be a good friend. Jehovah Raah means The LORD Is My Shepherd. God is a friend who provides extravagant nourishment, protection, as well as rest for our weary bodies and souls.

Jehovah Tsidkenu (The LORD Our Righteousness)

First seen in Jeremiah 23:6 – Only other occurrence is in Jeremiah 33:16
Jehovah is actually YHWH (see Yahweh above) and means Lord and Master. It is the promised and proper name of God. Tsidkenu means justice, rightness, righteousness, deliverance, victory, and prosperity. Used together Jehovah Tsidkenu means The LORD Who Is Our Righteousness. God himself stands for us and provides us with His righteousness and justice when we don’t have any in ourselves. He is the one who provides victory and our prosperity.

Jehovah Shammah (The LORD Is There)

Occurs only once in Ezekiel 48:35
Jehovah is actually YHWH (see Yahweh above) and means Lord and Master. It is the promised and proper name of God. Shammah is an adverb that simply means there, although when it’s used in relation to time it means then. Together Jehovah Shammah means The LORD is There. God revealed this name at a time when Israel was in rebellion and in captivity. God was letting the Jews know that he had not forsaken them and that he was still there, both in their present as well as in their future. Regardless of what you are going through, or what you are heading into, you can take comfort knowing that God is already there.

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